Texting & Driving

texting-and-drivingSolution:  Institute a one-year mandatory prison sentence for the first offense.

I have chosen the problem of inattentive driving because of texting.

Likely objections:

It is too severe for a first-time offense, especially considering drunk drivers do not always go to jail on their first offense.

Our jails are already overcrowded with violent offenders. This would cause the jail population to increase monumentally. This along with driver safety is why Concrete Solutions Macomb County has very strict guidelines for their drivers to ensure  none of their employee’s become a statistic.

According to federalregister.gov, the annual cost to house an inmate in 2014 was $30,619.85 or $83.89 per day. To house an inmate for a year for a first texting offense is not fiscally feasible.

A large percentage of offenders would most likely be teenagers just getting their license. This would take them out of their schooling for a year and potentially delay their high school graduation and college plans, would go on their permanent record and affect their employment potential and possibility expose them to a criminal element which could cause negative influence.  Obviously, if there was an accident caused by texting, then prison terms would be appropriate.

On the other hand, some might object to texting be too limiting. What is the difference between texting and checking email or surfing the internet? Some people watch movies or read while driving.  A more difficult situation to address is checking GPS.  What is the difference between typing in a text while driving and typing in an address while driving?  There are also people who eat and put on their makeup or shave while driving.  Different activities, but still a cause of distraction.  If there was a law against texting and driving, should not it also include any form of distraction?

A more difficult situation to address is checking GPS.  What is the difference between typing in a text while driving and typing in an address while driving?  There are also people who eat and put on their makeup or shave while driving.  Different activities, but still a cause of distraction.  If there was a law against texting and driving, should not it also include any form of distraction?

Solution:

Instead of a 1-year prison sentence, adjust it to a fine, suspension of driver’s license, points, community service and house arrest with an ankle monitor.  The defendant, or their parents if a minor, would be required to pay a monthly monitoring fee to assist with the additional costs to the state.  The defendant would still be able to attend school or work.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *